8 Weeks of Sheep Breed Spinning and Dyeing – Cheviot

by April May 05, 2017

This is some tough stuff! This week, in my eight weeks of sheep breed spinning and dyeing, I worked with Cheviot roving. If you are looking for a wear and felt resistant wool, this is your best friend! This roving behaved completely different than what I was anticipating and definitely kept me on my toes. This old English sheep breed has a wool with a lofty feel that was really interesting to work with.

Cheviot sheep are an English sheep breed dating all the way back to 1372. This polled sheep is a medium large, dual-purpose breed ranging from 120-200lbs. The Cheviot wool has a staple length of about three to five inches and a micron count of 27-33 microns. The crimp on the wool is a helical crimp providing it with both durability and resistance, making this wool perfect for items that will be getting quite a bit of wear.

Dyeing Cheviot Sheep Breed Wool

Dyeing this fiber was a learning experience. I used the same method of dyeing as last week using our Country Classics Dye. To see how I dyed last weeks’ Targhee roving, click here. The wool surprisingly did not retain the vinegar water mixture when I tried to apply the dye which made it difficult. I’m thinking, I should have used a dye dissolved in water or should have kettle dyed this roving, however, I am pleased with the color.

Spinning Cheviot Sheep Breed Wool

I spun this yarn to the left with our Ashland Bay Cheviot Roving. I naturally spin pretty fine, no thicker than a sport weight usually. However, for me, this roving naturally spun up in a medium to very thick weight. The slight inconsistencies in spinning make for a beautiful thick and thin art yarn! I would love to spin enough of this to make a cool art yarn rug.

I feel this yarn turned out pretty cool overall, very different than what I’m used to but I really enjoyed the experience. I’m glad I got a chance to branch out of my norm and work with a different type of wool. This roving is more suitable for the intermediate to advanced spinners as it is not the easiest to draft. I would love to take this roving and blend it with a BLF to make it a little softer and easier to work with or get some of our mohair fleece locks to make some fun art yarn. If you are looking for a durable or art yarn, I hope you have a chance to give this roving a try.



April
April

Author


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Paradise Fibers Blog

The Next Big Thing in Hand Dyed Roving and Yarn!

by Bobby September 22, 2018

This September in our Fiber of the Month Club, we took our members back to Fiber Art school with 5 unique spinning fibers, a never before seen highlighter dyeing tutorial, a lesson on creating classic tweed yarn, and an introduction to a time-tested technique to get the most yardage out of your wool when hand spinning! Have […]

Continue Reading

How to Make Tweed Yarn in 10 Easy Steps!

by Bobby September 22, 2018

This September in our Fiber of the Month Club, we took our members back to Fiber Art school with 5 unique spinning fibers, a never before seen highlighter dyeing tutorial, a lesson on creating classic tweed yarn, and an introduction to a time-tested technique to get the most yardage out of your wool when hand spinning! Have […]

Continue Reading

How to Spin a Funfetti Birthday Cake Inspired Yarn. August 2018 Fiber Club Unboxing and Tutorial

by Bobby August 16, 2018

Happy birthday to our Fiber of the Month Club! It’s been five years of mystery fiber goodness! So today, we are going to explore special birthdays from different cultures! From the Latin American quinceañera to the Japanese kanreki, all over the world humanity celebrates landmark birthdays, and here we are to celebrate ours with you! […]

Continue Reading